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Long-life lactose-free milk is exposed to challenges in relation  to shelf-life, stability and quality, including taste and appearance, when stored unrefrigerated for a longer period, which is the case in many parts of the world. Researchers from Aarhus University are currently studying how so-called lactase enzymes – enzymes added to lactose-free UHT milk, in order for people suffering from lactose intolerance to be able to drink it – affect the milk, and if these can be improved.

2019.08.20 | DCA

New and cleaner enzymes to improve the quality of long-life lactose-free milk

Long-life milk (ultra-high-temperature (UHT) processed milk) is a growing global market. However, especially long-life lactose-free milk is exposed to challenges in relation to shelf-life, stability and quality, including taste and appearance, when stored unrefrigerated for a longer period, which is the case in many parts of the world.…

Professor Hildegarde Heymann from University of California Davis is now an Honorary Professor in ‘Advanced Sensory Methodologies for Innovation in Food Quality’ at the Department of Food Science at Aarhus University.

2019.08.16 | DCA

New affiliated professor brings advanced sensory science methods to innovation in food quality

Professor Hildegarde Heymann from University of California Davis is now an Honorary Professor in ‘Advanced Sensory Methodologies for Innovation in Food Quality’ at the Department of Food Science at Aarhus University.

Researcher Maria Knadel is part of a team  who has developed a new and quick method to predict the transport of chemicals through the soil. Read more on page 14 in the annual report from DCA. Photo: Søren Kjeldgaard, AU Photo

2019.07.08 | DCA

Annual Report: Gain insight into the food and agricultural research at Aarhus University

DCA - Danish Centre for Food and Agriculture has published its annual report for 2018.

Researchers from Aarhus University are investigating soil from widely different locations, including Greenland. Photo: Jesper Overgård Lehmann

2019.06.28 | Agro

Getting the full picture of the soil

Researchers will take a holistic approach in order to gain a deeper understanding of what drives soil resilience in a changing climate.

Nematodes can cause great harm to crops, such as this rootknot on the roots of a carrot. Photo: Mette Vestergård

2019.06.28 | Agro

Nematode protection mechanisms to be elucidated

Certain nematodes cause great damage to crops and can be difficult to control. An improved understanding of nematodes' modes of action can contribute to developing efficient methods of control.

Crops such as maize and barley can benefit from the legacy left in the soil by cover crops. Photo: Janne Hansen

2019.06.28 | Agro

The right cover crop mix is the right choice for the environment

Optimising the combination of cover crop species can help reduce agriculture’s impact on the environment by improving nitrogen use efficiency.

Beef consumption is responsible for 11 percent of the carbon footprint of our total diet including beverages. Photo: Colourbox

2019.06.27 | Agro

To eat beef or not to eat beef?

Reducing your consumption of beef can be climate-friendly, but things are not that simple. Researchers are trying to nuance the climate debate by showing the full picture.

Legumes can improve soil nitrogen and carbon content. Photo: Colourbox

2019.06.26 | Agro

Researchers zoom in on the world of the root zone

There is a knowledge gap regarding the processes and mechanisms that control nitrogen and carbon build-up in the root zone of legumes. Researchers from Aarhus University are setting out to close that gap in a new project.

Professor David S. Powlson from Rothamsted Research presented Rector Brian Bech Nielsen, Aarhus University, with a congratulatory certificate on the occasion of the 125h anniversary celebration. Photo: Janne Hansen

2019.06.14 | Agro

125th anniversary celebrated at Askov Experimental Station

Aarhus University’s long-term field experiments on manure and mineral fertilisers at Askov Experimental Station have provided soil, plants and data for a wide range of studies over the years. Some of the results were presented at the celebration of the 125th anniversary of the experiments.

Associate Professor René Gislum from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University has been appointed president of the International Herbage Seed Group. Stockphoto

2019.06.17 | Agro

Researcher from Aarhus University appointed president of international seed group

Associate Professor René Gislum from the Department of Agroecology at Aarhus University has been appointed president of the International Herbage Seed Group.

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