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Derek V. Byrne has been appointed professor and head of the Food Metabolomics and Sensory research group in the Department of Food Science.

2014.02.24 | DCA

New professor in the Department of Food Science at Aarhus University

Derek Victor Byrne has been appointed as professor and head of the Food Metabolomics and Sensory research group in the Department of Food Science at Aarhus University.

The grain from the genetically modified barley is manually harvested using scissors. All other plant material apart from the ears is then collected in containers and sent for incineration. After the harvest, the field is sprayed with Roundup to kill all seedlings produced from spilt grain. Photo: Inger Holme

2014.02.25 | DCA

Conventional breeding and genetic engineering go hand in hand

People, the environment and farm animals can benefit from cereal grains that have been bred to have increased phytase activities – an enzyme that increases the availability of phosphate and other minerals. Conventional plant breeding methods cannot stand alone, but may be combined with the process of cisgenesis.

A bumble bee pollinating red clover. This forage legume is at the centre of a new research project to boost the export of legume seeds in an attempt to imitate the successful export of grass seeds where Denmark dominates the market. Photo: Ulla Andersen, AU

2014.03.27 | Research

Research to boost to Danish export of forage legumes

Denmark is a major producer of white clover seeds. A new research project involving Aarhus University and commercial seed companies aims to boost the yield of white clover and the growing of red clover and alfalfa.

Research results obtained from nutritional studies using animal models can be directly transferred to humans, according to a study by scientists from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. Photo: AU

2014.03.13 | Research

Pigs are good models for digestion in humans

Pigs and humans are very alike when it comes to the impact of diet on metabolic processes, according to a study by scientists from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. This knowledge is useful because nutritional studies using animal models can be transferred to humans.

More kits produced per mink female gives a better figure on the bottom line. Photo: Jesper Clausen

2014.03.04 | DCA

Higher income through higher welfare in fur farming

Danish scientists aim to improve the economy of Danish mink production by around 500 million DKK a year by increasing the survival rate of kits while also improving animal welfare and reducing the environmental impact.