Technology and future crop production

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Technology and future crop production

Technology and the farming of the future will be spotighted in connection with the inaugural lecture given by honorary professor at the Department of Agroecology Ole Green. Photo: Ole Green

2017.10.16 |

Focus on technology and future farming

The Department of Agroecology has extensive collaboration with the industry. An example of this is the collaboration with CEO Ole Green, Agrointelli. Ole Green is the department’s recently appointed honorary professor and will give his inaugural lecture in October 2017.  

It is worthwhile to take good care of our agricultural soil; researchers from Aarhus University are partners in an EU project that targets this issue. Photo: Janne Hansen

2017.10.16 |

Nurture the soil – it’s worth it

Profitability and sustainability can go hand in hand in crop production – especially if cropping systems that protect the soil are developed and applied. This is the basis for a new EU project with the participation of researchers from Aarhus University.

Ole Green will give his inaugural lecture on October 24, 2017 at AU Foulum and October 31, 2017 at AU Flakkebjerg. Photo: Agrointelli

2017.09.18 |

Technology and the agriculture of the future on the agenda

Sustainability, technology and intelligent solutions go hand in hand in the agriculture of the future. The newly appointed honorary professor at the Department of Agroecology will speak about this in his inaugural lecture in October 2017.

Intensive cereal farming depletes soil carbon, degrades soil fertility, reduces biodiversity, and negatively affects climate and the environment. Photo: Colourbox

2017.09.14 |

More carbon in the soil, please

Conventional and organic crop farming can both reap the benefits of managing the soil in a more sustainable fashion, so that more carbon is added. Researchers from Aarhus University are part of a team that is developing new cropping systems to address these issues.

The right amounts of nitrogen help assure optimal grasslands. Photo: Colourbox

2017.02.08 |

Nitrogen application in grass-clover and grass seed needs the right balance

New technology will help farmers maintain the balance between too much and too little nitrogen in grass-clover and grass seed fields to the benefit of the crops and the environment.

Researchers from Aarhus University are coordinating a European project that supports implementation of sustainable, integrated weed management in Europa. Photo: Janne Hansen

2017.01.11 |

New times ahead for European weed management

Integrated weed management is the way to go for sustainable and resilient agriculture. A new Horizon 2020 project will support and promote its implementation in Europe.

Weeds can be avoided and herbicide use curbed significantly with the aid of new technology. Photo: Janne Hansen

2017.08.07 |

Artificial intelligence can reduce herbicide use by 75 percent

A new project will create a system in which a camera and sprayer work together to automatically recognise weeds in the field and only spray when necessary.

It is important to apply an amount of fertiliser that ensures an optimal ratio between clover and grass. Photo: Janne Hansen

2016.11.14 |

Nitrogen, clover, camera and image analysis all come together

New technology that combines cameras, sensors, computers and smartphones aims to increase productivity and may help reduce nitrogen fertilisation in clover-grass fields.

Farmed soil is under pressure from heavy agricultural machinery. Collaborative efforts between scientists, businesses and advisers aim to find solutions to the problem.  Photo: Per Schjønning

2016.10.12 |

Machine design and crop choice can reduce soil compaction

Heavy agricultural machinery used to cultivate the soil, apply animal manure and harvest crops contributes to the degradation of farmland. Innovation in relation to technology and crops can help remedy this serious problem.

If we do not take good care of our soil resource, we risk destroying it so that it loses its ability to grow crops. Photo: Per Marcussen

2015.07.01 |

Soil under pressure

The majority of the food we eat originates directly or indirectly from the soil. But soil fertility is under threat because of the way we treat it. This is a topic to which much research is being devoted at Aarhus University, working alongside the agricultural industry and the authorities.

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